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oh yeah. and these showed up in my garden unannounced (photo credit lowtechlowlife.tumblr.com)

oh yeah. and these showed up in my garden unannounced (photo credit lowtechlowlife.tumblr.com)

(Source: lowtechlowlife, via lowtechlowlife)

— 1 year ago with 6 notes
lowtechlowlife:

My 12 year old beagle relaxing in between the vegetables.

babely.

lowtechlowlife:

My 12 year old beagle relaxing in between the vegetables.

babely.

— 1 year ago with 10 notes
pappubahry:

Neptune, seen from the Keck Observatory in the infrared (wavelength 1.17-1.3 microns), 11 August 2004.  (Program ID N19N2.)

pappubahry:

Neptune, seen from the Keck Observatory in the infrared (wavelength 1.17-1.3 microns), 11 August 2004.  (Program ID N19N2.)

(via comaberenice)

— 1 year ago with 23353 notes
slapandstipple:

A sketch of snail shells, which I found in the garden and fungi.
Graphite

slapandstipple:

A sketch of snail shells, which I found in the garden and fungi.

Graphite

(via findingfungi)

— 1 year ago with 49 notes

rhamphotheca:

Lost World Locked in Stone at Fossil Lake

by Megan Gannon

With just two inhabited buildings and a population of five, Fossil, Wyo., is all but a ghost town today. But as far as ghosts go, the ones at Fossil are pretty remarkable — 50-million-year-old monitor lizards, stingrays and freakishly long-tailed turtles among them.

Fossil showed promise of becoming a train-stop city during America’s westward expansion. The town’s real golden age, however, may have been the early Eocene, when it was covered in a subtropical lake with an incredible diversity of aquatic life, surrounded by lush mountains and active volcanoes

(read more: Live Science)

Images (Photos by Lance Grande from The Lost World of Fossil Lake: Snapshots from Deep Time, © 2013, published by the University of Chicago Press):

T - This is the most complete skeleton of a so-called dawn horse ever discovered. This specimen of Protorohippus venticolus was much more diminutive than today’s horses, standing less than two feet high at the shoulder, but its long back legs suggest it was a good jumper. Perhaps it was less skilled as a swimmer; researchers aren’t sure how the horse ended up at the bottom of the middle of Fossil Lake but they suspect it drowned, possibly trying to escape a predator.

B - This fossil immortalizes stingray sex of the Eocene. The male and female fat-tailed stingrays (Asterotrygon maloneyi) shown here were likely mating or just about to mate when they were killed, researchers believe.

— 1 year ago with 407 notes

Sora Radish and “Orchard Radnip” (as I’m calling them) harvest. The purple one apparently got more true Turnip genes than the others. Rad!

— 1 year ago
#radishes  #radish  #radnip  #radnips  #turnip  #turnips  #sora  #sora radish  #orchard radnip  #gardening  #garden journal  #garden  #vegetables  #vegetable  #food not lawns  #farm  #farming  #tinydreamfarm 
Radish Harvest

Here’s a Sora Radish still in the ground. I love radishes mostly because they grow and finish so quickly. Seriously a survival food—-and pretty, too.

I saved what I thought were turnip seeds from my friends’ garden in California last summer. Last week, we determined that they were probably the white radishes they had grown. Now, we’re thinking that they’re a radish-turnip cross, which is very exciting. Radnips! They’re growing way faster than my other turnips, and have a mellower taste than the Sora radishes.

— 1 year ago with 1 note
#radish  #turnip  #radnips  #radnip  #garden  #garden journal  #gardening  #harvesting  #harvest  #tinydreamfarm  #growing food  #farming  #farm  #food not lawns 

Canisters Filled With Unclaimed Human Remains from the Oregon State Insane Asylum from between 1883 and the 1970’s.

Library Of Colorful Decay

Cool-lookin’.

(Source: unicorn-meat-is-too-mainstream, via we-are-star-stuff)

— 1 year ago with 1653 notes
#decay  #minerals 
rorschachx:

The innocuous-looking harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis, shown left) wields a biological weapon of mass destruction. Europe and North America imported the insects in the early 20th century to control pesky aphids. But the harlequin, native to Asia, began to flourish, crowding out the native seven-spotted ladybug (Coccinella septempunctata, shown inset). Scientists previously thought that the harlequin prospered because of an unusually strong antimicrobial immune system, which would protect it from disease in a foreign environment. But the beetle’s more potent secret is a fungal parasite, in the insect-afflicting Nosema genus, which lives in the beetle’s blood. The parasite doesn’t affect the harlequin but fatally overwhelms seven-spotted lady beetles within 2 weeks of infection, researchers report online today in Science. Ladybugs commonly eat the eggs of competing species, so when seven-spotted beetles feast on the harlequin’s parasite-laden eggs, the parasite strikes back. Researchers say that foreign invaders fare better when they bring along diseases that they’re already tolerant of, while other, closely related species (such as the seven-spotted ladybug) might not enjoy such conquistador-like success. | via sciencemag.org

Know yr ladybugs.

rorschachx:

The innocuous-looking harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis, shown left) wields a biological weapon of mass destruction. Europe and North America imported the insects in the early 20th century to control pesky aphids. But the harlequin, native to Asia, began to flourish, crowding out the native seven-spotted ladybug (Coccinella septempunctata, shown inset). Scientists previously thought that the harlequin prospered because of an unusually strong antimicrobial immune system, which would protect it from disease in a foreign environment. But the beetle’s more potent secret is a fungal parasite, in the insect-afflicting Nosema genus, which lives in the beetle’s blood. The parasite doesn’t affect the harlequin but fatally overwhelms seven-spotted lady beetles within 2 weeks of infection, researchers report online today in Science. Ladybugs commonly eat the eggs of competing species, so when seven-spotted beetles feast on the harlequin’s parasite-laden eggs, the parasite strikes back. Researchers say that foreign invaders fare better when they bring along diseases that they’re already tolerant of, while other, closely related species (such as the seven-spotted ladybug) might not enjoy such conquistador-like success. | via sciencemag.org

Know yr ladybugs.

— 1 year ago with 260 notes